MysteryPeople Interviews Helen Currie Foster

helen-currie-foster-hotxsincAMW member Helen Currie Foster was interviewed for the MysteryPeople blog by Crime Fiction Coordinator Scott Montgomery. Helen is the author of the  Alice MacDonald Greer mystery series: GHOST CAVE, GHOST DOG, GHOST LETTER, GHOST DAGGER, and THE GHOST NEXT DOOR.

Midwest Book Review calls the Alice MacDonald Greer mysteries a 2018-10-10-helen-currie-foster-gng-cover“simply outstanding mystery series.”

Read Helen’s interview with MysteryPeople here.

 

 

 

 

The Waiting Game

Austin Mystery Writer Helen Currie Foster describes how it feels the week AFTER she finishes a book.

Reblogged from Writing Wranglers and Warriors.

Writing Wranglers and Warriors

helen-currie-foster-hotxsinc Written by Helen Currie Foster

 The first week after the book is finished. Horrible. Finishing a book feels a bit like having a broken spring. A cartoon clock where the springs go SPROING out the back, twisting like Little Orphan Annie’s ringlets.

mcinnesPost-book dementia has been ignored by the scientific community. Yet it’s a known syndrome, leaving the writer desperate.

Symptoms? Apathy. Refusal to read headlines. Compulsive retreat into mysteries from the sixties—John MacDonald. Helen MacInnes. Waking at three a.m. and staring into darkness, lost without a plot tangle to unravel. Executive function area of brain on unauthorized vacation.

Cures? None known. One wise practitioner advises Tincture of Time. Thyme? What did he say?

Anodynes?

Hard runs, uphill both ways. Try to beat your own best thyme. Time?

Locate small child. Ask child about book plot for witch and wizard story, using “Yes And!” for action sequence.

Eat…

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Chicken Diapers, Pinterest and Research

Austin Mystery Writer KP Gresham on one of the joys of research . . .

Writing Wranglers and Warriors

K.P. Gresham Cropped Color Portrait  Written by Kathy Gresham


Sometimes my descriptions of a scene, idea, character, etc. can use a little pictorial help. For me, I find Pinterest can be a great resource to help me get the picture in my mind “just right”. Other times, I’ve used it to store ideas for future writing, motivate me when I need a new idea, and in a few cases, to prove a theory of a book I’m working on.

I have a couple of manuscripts in the drawer (that’s a writer’s way of talking about finished manuscripts that you haven’t sent out to any agents or editors YET}. Two of them are fun little murder mysteries that take place in a small Illinois town called Hardscrabble. The title on my Pinterest account for this series is Hardscrabble Homecoming. I have a Pinterest board for each of my series: “Chicago Cubs” supports my 2016 novel,

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